Austrian girls forced to wear hijabs to avoid harassment, Ex-MP claims

Austrian girls forced to wear hijabs to avoid harassment, Ex-MP claims

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According to Doctor Marcus Franz, who used to serve as a lawmaker in the National Council, there are “problem zones” in the country’s capital where local girls are being forced to hide that they are Austrian.

Former member of the Austrian National Council, Doctor Marcus Franz, stated in an interview to broadcaster oe24.TV that he knew fathers in Vienna’s “problem areas” who give their daughters hijabs in order not to let them be recognised as Austrians and protect them from harassment. He cited witnesses from his personal acquaintances in the 15th district of the Austrian capital.

The man pointed to “permanent micro-aggression”. He said girls are dressing differently than people in Austria are used to because of an “unhealthy aggressive attitude”.

“Girls, young women as well as older women are simply afraid. You can observe this among people, you can see it plain and simple when you work in a social profession — as I do. And one should make a clear distinction between those who are new and those who have already been with us for a long time”, he stated.

Since 2015, Europe has been facing a migration crisis, with scores of refugees arriving from conflict-torn countries and crime rates being increasingly linked to the drastic influx of migrants all across the continent, particularly in Germany, France, Belgium, and even the comparatively well-off Austria.

According to a Crime and Safety report by the United States Department of State, Austria is targeted by largely foreign criminals, with 64 percent of drug-related offences being carried out by criminals who are born abroad.

The discussion flared up after the murder of a 16-year-old girl in the Austrian city of Steyr. The key suspect in her brutal stabbing is asylum seeker Saber Akhondzada, who was denied asylum, but allowed to stay in the country, as he is wanted on murder charges in his home country of Afghanistan because Austria does not deport people facing a death sentence in another country.

According to the victim’s family, she had recurring rows with her possessive boyfriend Akhondzada, reacting violently to the girl talking to other men and thus trying to intimidate her.__The Nation

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